theparisreview
theparisreview:

“We decided to stop drinking and spend Sunday at the zoo. It was going nicely until she worked herself up over the observation that it was a horrible thing to cage the animals.
“‘That’s not very profound,’ I said, ‘everybody who goes to the zoo feels that sometime.’
“‘Oh, you cruel bastard,’ she screamed, ‘I’m not everybody!’
“She bellied over the guard rail and flung herself against the bars of the wolves’ cage.
“Three wolves had been circling and as soon as she touched the bar they froze, fur bristling along their spines.
“She had her arms stuck in between the bars up to her shoulders and as much of her face as she could wedge in yelling, ‘Eat me! Eat me!’ to the wolves.”
—Stuart Dybek, “Sunday at the Zoo”Photography Still from Jean Cocteau’s Testament of Orpehus via 50 Watts

theparisreview:

“We decided to stop drinking and spend Sunday at the zoo. It was going nicely until she worked herself up over the observation that it was a horrible thing to cage the animals.

“‘That’s not very profound,’ I said, ‘everybody who goes to the zoo feels that sometime.’

“‘Oh, you cruel bastard,’ she screamed, ‘I’m not everybody!’

“She bellied over the guard rail and flung herself against the bars of the wolves’ cage.

“Three wolves had been circling and as soon as she touched the bar they froze, fur bristling along their spines.

“She had her arms stuck in between the bars up to her shoulders and as much of her face as she could wedge in yelling, ‘Eat me! Eat me!’ to the wolves.”

Stuart Dybek, “Sunday at the Zoo”
Photography Still from Jean Cocteau’s Testament of Orpehus via 50 Watts

livelymorgue

livelymorgue:

April 22, 1939: “We are amused,” King George and Queen Elizabeth, with the Princess Elizabeth, intently watch the show from the royal box at a special actors’ fund matinee at the Coliseum in London. Under a text that read “Headliners,” this photo sat next to one of Eleanor Roosevelt at the White House Easter Monday party. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue

livelymorgue:

Oct. 26, 1976: “In Tux and Gowns, Some Outdoor Types Climb the Walls,” was the headline for an article that accompanied this photo of a benefit dinner for Outward Bound at the Plaza Hotel. “The loudest cheers came from the women, since the crowd of 500 included several corporate wives who have been off climbing mountains without their mates,” the reporter wrote. The evening’s only mishap? Somebody tripped on a loose carpet. Photo: Chester Higgins Jr./The New York Times

curiositycounts
curiositycounts:

“The Women of the Future” according to 1902 French Trading CardsIn 1902, a French trading card manufacturer released this curious batch of playing cards depicting women and their futuristic careers as soldiers, lawyers, journalists, and cigarette-chomping students. But because these cards were designed to titillate, many of these outfits aren’t entirely practical — note the firefighter and general’s lack of sleeves above. In fact, much of the military regalia pictured wouldn’t be handy whatsoever in the battlefield.(via) 

curiositycounts:

“The Women of the Future” according to 1902 French Trading Cards

In 1902, a French trading card manufacturer released this curious batch of playing cards depicting women and their futuristic careers as soldiers, lawyers, journalists, and cigarette-chomping students. But because these cards were designed to titillate, many of these outfits aren’t entirely practical — note the firefighter and general’s lack of sleeves above. In fact, much of the military regalia pictured wouldn’t be handy whatsoever in the battlefield.

(via